What pops into your head when you read these words?

Mindfulness
Self-awareness
Living in the present
Meditation

Probably something buddha-y or someone with their eyes closed on the beach. Right?

Maybe you hear these words too much and they are so overused you kind of tune them out whenever you see them.

People tell you to practice these words, that they are “good” for you. But has anyone ever explained why?

The most common, generic answer is, “these activities reduce stress”. Even I’m guilty of saying this – cause it’s a simple way to cover everything.

But let’s be honest, “REDUCES STRESS” is not really the most inspiring phrase to get you interested in building a daily practice.

So I thought I’d share some real-life examples of how creating a mindfulness/self-awareness/living-in-the-present/meditation practice can help you:

1) PREVENT INJURY WHEN YOU ARE RUNNING
When you are doing any repetitive exercise it’s a great practice to be mindful of your movements. Don’t just run, pay attention to your gate, how your feet are rotated, how your breath syncs up, how each foot hits the ground, etc. At some running shoe stores they even have people that will watch how you run and then help you select a shoe based on your specific needs.

2) OVERCOME FEAR ABOUT GOING TO THE DENTIST
When your mind is racing you can learn to go back into your body to ground you and help you deal with your feelings.

3) CLEAN YOUR TOILET WITHOUT A BACK SPASM
I can’t count how many times by roommate would throw her back out doing the most mundane activities. When we forget about our bodies, it can go back to bad movement patterns and refresh an old injury.

4) HAVE THAT UNCOMFORTABLE CONVERSATION YOU’VE BEEN PUTTING OFF
When you start feeling a wave of emotion taking over it’s a good time to get back into your body. Your body is always in the present moment, even when your mind is in emotion-overdrive . Learning to ground yourself into your body can help you feel more emotionally stable and balanced.

5) ASK FOR THAT RAISE
Practicing mindfulness can create clarity and self-trust.

6) PREPARE YOURSELF FOR THAT BOUT OF INEVITABLE STAGE FRIGHT

7) REMAIN CALM DURING RUSH HOUR TRAFFIC

8) STOP OVEREATING

9) REDUCE SEVERITY OF COLD SYMPTOMS
Knowing your body can help you feel a cold coming on and you can take better care of yourself to minimize the severity of your cold symptoms.

10) BE A BETTER PARENT OR PARTNER
Obviously, developing more patience and presence will help you be a better family member. Starting a mindful practice will also help you enjoy things more. The stressful times will pass easier and the fun times will be more vivid.

“These all sound great, but I’m super busy and don’t have 30 minutes a day to sit in Lotus position,” is probably what you’re thinking.

And “developing a mindfulness practice” just sounds so… SERIOUS.

It does sound serious (and a little boring) BUT it doesn’t have to be, I promise.

A mindfulness practice is (to me) about living in the present moment and being aware of ourselves and the things around us on a daily basis. Because I get tired of the word “mindfulness” and I like to incorporate a lot of movement-based, body-awareness activities – I have started calling it being an Everyday Dancer.

If you want to check out some ideas for starting a non-boring, not-too-serious face mindfulness practice go here to download your free workbook with 12 activities to get you started. You can do one each day or one each week. Mix it up or find one you like and stick to it.


Everyday Dancer Workbook

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Download your FREE Everyday Dancer Workbook! 

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Jalene

Jalene

Jalene has been studying various dance and movement forms since 1998. While she is still in love with dance as performance art she is currently focusing on bringing dance into everyday lives and guiding others through their own explorations of dance, artistic expression, and self-discovery.
Jalene

Author: Jalene

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